Friday, 2 January 2015

Herald article on "history of Glasgow Asylum" with mention of "better drugs now" and my response

The Glasgow Royal Lunatic Asylum in Parliamentary Road 1827
'Research uncovers surprisingly enlightened history of Glasgow Asylum'  

Herald Scotland article, 31 December 2014, and my comment in response to the quote from Dr Iain Smith: 

"We have better drugs now which are more effective for specific problems - with anti psychotics, antidepressants, and mood stabilisers.

"Although I agree that asylums in Scotland were at times places of refuge I think that they were also places where people sequestered relatives who were either an embarassment, through their lifestyle or beliefs, or who did not confirm to society's understanding of "normal".

I don't agree with Dr Smith's statement "We have better drugs now which are more effective for specific problems - with anti psychotics, antidepressants, and mood stabilisers.". I speak from personal experience of taking these pills, having been compelled to do so after a menopausal psychosis or altered mind state. The drugs have disabling short and long term side effects. They caused depression in me, the antidepressant suicidal impulse (many have black box warnings) and the "mood stabiliser" did nothing of the kind, rather it flattened what mood I had left.

So the drugs don't "work" for everyone. I had to taper the drugs and get off them, under my own steam. And the fact is that patients on the neuroleptics long term do develop physical health issues - increased risk of diabetes, tardive dyskinesia (shakes) and with some drugs a loss of balance, requiring walking with a stick. See link to award-winning book 'Anatomy of an Epidemic' by investigative journalist Robert Whitaker, former Boston Globe science reporter:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anatomy_of_an_Epidemic  "


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